It's movie list time - best sports films

 

When I rank movies, regardless of the type of list, I use the same system to get the result - can or will I watch this movie again. This means picking up the movie at virtually any point and following it to the end. It’s a movie that even though I know what’a going to happen and can in most cases recite the dialogue as it happens, I’ve got an attachment because of the script and casting.

These are the movies that do that best in the sports category - none of which I saw in a theater, but on network television of as a VHS rental.

 

FIELD OF DREAMS, 1989

 

I didn’t see this film until reading the owners of one of the two fields used for production of the film had decided to grow corn again. The other field, of course, is a national landmark and might be the site of a regular season game this summer if the Majors are allowed to play. The performances of Kevin Costner, James Earl Jones, Burt Lancaster, Amy Madigan and Ray Liotta showed off some fabulous casting. The story they weave through is wonderful fiction, the kind that might make you ... well, dream about the greatness of the game of baseball and how it can provide a hand in making personal amends in ones history with family.

 

ROCKY, 1976

 

Two pieces of greatness of this film are that Sylvester Stallone wrote it for himself to star in, and it’s the movie that gave the world the steadicam, created by one its production crew. Stallone’s script is more about the personal development of the characters than it is with boxing, which helped the film win the Academy Award for Best Movie. Stallone, Burgess Meredith, Talia Shire, even Burt Young  grow from being nobodies to characters who an audience has an emotional attachment with that survives Rocky actually losing the big fight at the end. And, all those sequels - Rocky III almost made this list.

 

BULL DURHAM, 1988

 

One big question about this film is when do you share it with your son? Kids nowadays don’t seem to be able to laugh at the basic obsenity that makes this movie so memorable. Again (even though it was released a year before “Field of Dreams”), Costner is fabulous casting as “Crash” Davis, and Tim Robbins is memorable as the over-talented Ebby Calvin “Nuke” Laloosh, both walking us through the highway of life at the lowest level of pro baseball. Maybe it’s more vibrant than the majors. Susan Sarandon’s Annie Savoy puts the film onto this list.  

 

THE HUSTLER, 1962

 

Like Rocky, it’s a drama you get into because of the acting, primarily Paul Newman. Jackie Gleason, George C. Scott and Piper Laurie are great casting that carries you through more than two hours. The lengthy billiards scenes are so much different than the chase or fight scenes of modern action films in that they have dialogue that adds to the drama of the story. You wouldn’t think about getting up and buying a beer in a theater because the story keeps developing. And, it led to one of the great sequels for any movie - “The Color of Money,” three decades later. 

 

CADDYSHACK, 1980

 

I can laugh all the way through this movie because of how stupid it is, which pretty much makes the best comedies. There’s so many wonderfully dry comedic performances. Bill Murray, Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield, Ted Knight and whoever played Danny (a very young Michael O’Keefe) move the story along one laugh at a time. In watching a very funny dockumentary on the film, you learn producers realized late in filming that Murray and Chase hadn’t appeared in the same scene, which led to Chase hitting a ball into Murray’s disheveled bungalow where he displays his development of varieties of marijuana that could become the “grass” of future golf courses. Kenny Loggins’ soundtrack got me to buy the album. 

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