A great reason to coach photography

This weekend I'll probably coach my son for the final time in a sporting event.

It's been quite a few seasons, and a lot of fun, mostly, anyway.

We started with his first throw of a small, plush football that was a perfect spiral at age 18 months. And, while we never got to the level of club teams for more than a season, playing a sport three seasons per school year has been a wonderful experience and forged a strong bond between us. Until the teenage years, at least.

As we draw to a close in the Portland Parks Goldenball basketball season, it's a time to look back and think upon what I taught my son and/or what I hoped he learned from all the seasons of soccer, basketball, baseball and one season of football and lacrosse.

I'm not sure I have a good answer, which is a bit disappointing.

In contemplating these two thoughts, though, I reinforced my belief that photography is something every parent should focus on more as it relates to their children. And, it should be taught as a basic requirement in the education system. People should know how to take good pictures, how to print them out and what their importance is in the world.

It's something that should be talked about at the start of every season for every team - "hey, make sure we capture some of these moments on film (they're going to be printed on paper).

For one thing, pictures don't lie, at least not without Photoshop.

And, they tell stories that don't need words - words being one of the great methods of ruining any situation in parenting.

A whole lot of teams, especially ones that play indoors, have a handle on the value of photos at the end of a season through "Senior Night." That's when seniors and their families get a moment to celebrate the close of their son or daughter's athletic career with public recognition and a family picture. It's a very strong moment for most of these families and captured with a photo.

Or course, you don't know when your athletic career might end, so getting a photo from every season is important.

This past week I did the play-by-play for a webcast of the Grant at Jefferson boys basketball game, which was a great experience especially as the color guy ended up being Portland Community College coach Tony Broadous. We had a great time and the webcast showcased that, but I missed having someone take a photo of us, which would have multiplied the value of the experience. Thursday, I sang the national anthem at a high school basketball game ... with a parent as a duet, but missed getting a photo, which would have made my Facebook page go wild.

It's not something just for athletics either. How many parents are able to get a photo of their son or daughter studying? Some of the great photos from American history are of people just thinking - President John Kennedy and his brother Bobby during the Cuban Missile Crisis.

The skill of photography that might be taught is how to isolate specific photos. Everyone has a camera now via their cell phone, and can take thousands of pictures. They forward many of those photos to social media, and that's where the photos end. Getting a physical copy of photos is a tremendous loss in our society.

I think I have enough good pictures of my son, and daughter's athletic career, too, that I feel good about how he'll look back upon all those practices and games in two, five, 10 years and beyond. How we will look back upon them as we grow older.

 

 

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