tony broadous

Canzano misses boat on Pilots hoop - like everyone else

Wed, 03/25/2020 - 8:37am
Cliff Pfenning
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To get a handle on the University of Portland men's basketball program these days, you only had to follow the website coachesdatabase.com in February and look for head coach Terry Porter's name. The site has a section called the Hot Seat Report. From the hottest to just warm, the editors give you a good idea of who needs to perform the most, and the fastest, including Danny Manning at Wake Forest, Donyell Marshall at Central Connecticut and, for a time, Patrick Ewing at Georgetown.

But, Porter's name wasn't on that list.

At the tail end of a 15-game losing streak that closed the program's fourth straight season of finishing last or ninth in the 10-team West Coast Conference, Porter didn't make the even mildly hot list until Feb. 26. What's that say? Nobody's paying attention. And when nobody's paying attention to your basketball program, it probably shouldn't be your basketball program anymore.

In these challenging times, though, Portland announced Tuesday that Porter would return for the fifth and final year of the 2016 contract he signed that directed his focus from the NBA, where he was head coach for both the Milwaukee Bucks and Phoenix Suns, to the college game, where he has gotten to coach his two sons. The excitement Porter initially brought due to his long, memorable playing career with the Trail Blazers helped the school attract boosters, but it never transferred to the court. In four seasons, the Pilots won just seven conference games combined, including just one the past two seasons.

John Canzano, The Oregonian's sports columnist, wrote the school probably should work its way out of Porter's final year back in February. After Tuesday's announcement, he wrote again the school should have worked its way into another coach. "They punted," Canzano wrote. I'd agree with that except for the state of the world today, and making a coaching move of a popular and well-respected guy in charge truly unnecessary regardless of wins. The need to win at UP just isn't that great these days, and Porter already has a contract.

Anything short of a Disney+ "Miracle on the Bluff" season, though, and UP will be looking for another coach in 12 months.

In compiling a short list of candidates, Canzano showcased just how little attention the Pilots generate even to experienced journalists, and he missed the perfect candidate who's just two miles away from the Chiles Center. It's Tony Broadous, head coach of the Portland Community College program for the past eight seasons (and Grant High for a decade before that).

There is not a better choice for the Portland Pilots than Broadous, and he needs to be on the radar for the school because when I've talked with sports folks in the area about him at the University of Portland the main response has been "now that would be exciting."

Broadous moved from Grant, which won the state title in 2008 under his guidance, to PCC in 2012 with the idea that might lead to a four-year school in the future. The Panthers had just come off a winless season in which they lost games by an average of 37 points. The program had never been to the Northwest Athletic Association of Community Colleges playoffs in spite of the fact half the eight teams in their division qualified each year by finishing fourth or higher. In spite of sitting directly across the street from Jefferson High, the program had basically no pulse. That changed quickly.

In year one under Broadous, Portland missed the playoffs by just one win, and in year two ... it won the NWAACC title. Two years removed from a winless season, PCC had a league title (2014) in its first-ever trip to the playoffs.

In the past six seasons, in spite of being the only full-time coach and having no budget for anything but Facetime chats, Portland has been to the playoffs again four times, and reached the NWAACC tournament semifinals in 2018. They were headed to the tournament again this season before it was cancelled.

Moving from a former NBA coach and local basketball legend to a community college coach would be quite a gamble for UP, but that's exactly the kind of thing Disney+ was made for - and the Pilots desperately need that kind of attention. Broadous, 51, is worthy of that opportunity starting with his connections in Portland. People know him. And, his connections around the region - coaches know him. And, his work on the court - PCC is a regular winner and has all-league players each season.

Given the opportunity to recruit to a four-year program, with numerous full-time assistants, it's exciting to think what might happen in the Chiles Center starting in 2021.

Broadous isn't going to be an expensive hire - maybe the program could use some of that savings on an additional recruiting coordinator - and he's probably going to be extremely loyal if some success brings other schools calling.

Canzano's short list of successors had a few names tossed in to look impressive starting with Portlander and former Blazer Damon Stoudamire, the head coach of WCC rival Pacific. After three losing seasons, Stoudamire was on the Hot Seat for much of this season, but the Tigers won 23 games, and he was recently named the nation's minority coach of the year. One more solid season and big name programs will come calling. Portland's calls next season - even this past season - would be going to voicemail.

Former UC Santa Barbara coach Bob Williams made the list, but he's, well, who is he again to Portland fans?

Greg Clink has guided Chico State to regular success at Div. II, but he's been there for 12 secure seasons and, again, who's he to Portland fans?

Barret Peery is the head coach at Portland State, and has averaged 18 wins per season in his first three years there. Moving across town wouldn't be a stretch, but would involve rebuilding another program and he's got a lot more of a shot at winning a conference title in the program he's already building.

And, finally, former UNLV head coach Dave Rice, who led his alma mater to NCAA trips twice in five (full) seasons, more than a dozen wins over higher ranked teams, and claimed the top pick in the NBA Draft (2013 - Anthony Bennett) as program highlights. But, the school abruptly fired him during his sixth season - that doesn't speak well about making boosters happy. Since 2017, he's been an assistant at Washington, which finished last in the Pac-12 this season.

Gonzaga coach Mark Few has been vocal about WCC members needing to spend more on their programs so as to get more teams to the NCAA Tournament - and the riches that conference members share in. But, money doesn't always buy success in any sport, and neither do big names as the school has found out. Coaches sell dreams that need to turn into reality, and Broadous has enough of that on his resume to be able to recruit on Day One, in spite of that resume just being at the high school and community college level. And he's going to need to jump right in on Day One because of not having any ability to recruit during the season.

UP is still feeling the glow of its women's basketball team performing a Disney+ miracle by playing its way into the NCAA Tournament under a first-year coach and having been picked for last by conference head coaches. That coach, Michael Meek, was a former high school coach at Southridge in Beaverton, who moved to NCAA Div. III's George Fox in 2011.

So, the Pilots are secure for another season under Porter, but the coaching search for his replacement has likely already begun. When the names start to go on the big chalkboard, hopefully the school's athletic director, Scott Leykam, and his associates will take more than a few minutes to dream about what the Chiles Center might look like with maybe the nation's biggest underdog on the sideline at one of the nation's biggest underdogs as a program. That's a story made for the Magic Kingdom.

CORRECTION: A previous version of this story misidentified Barret Peery as the former head coach at Portland State and assistant on the UP staff. We regret that error.

Canzano misses boat on Pilots hoop

UP has a perfect successor to Terry Porter lined up just two miles away
By Cliff Pfenning, Oregonsports.com

To get a handle on the University of Portland men's basketball program these days, you only had to follow the website coachesdatabase.com in February and look for head coach Terry Porter's name. The site has a section called the Hot Seat Report. From the hottest to just warm, the editors give you a good idea of who needs to perform the most, and the fastest, including Danny Manning at Wake Forest, Donyell Marshall at Central Connecticut and, for a time, Patrick Ewing at Georgetown.

But, Porter's name wasn't on that list.

At the tail end of a 15-game losing streak that closed the program's fourth straight season of finishing last or ninth in the 10-team West Coast Conference, Porter didn't make the even mildly hot list until Feb. 26. What's that say? Nobody's paying attention. And when nobody's paying attention to your basketball program, it probably shouldn't be your basketball program anymore.

In these challenging times, though, Portland announced Tuesday that Porter would return for the fifth and final year of the 2016 contract he signed that directed his focus from the NBA, where he was head coach for both the Milwaukee Bucks and Phoenix Suns, to the college game, where he has gotten to coach his two sons. The excitement Porter initially brought due to his long, memorable playing career with the Trail Blazers helped the school attract boosters, but it never transferred to the court. In four seasons, the Pilots won just seven conference games combined, including just one the past two seasons.

John Canzano, The Oregonian's sports columnist, wrote the school probably should work its way out of Porter's final year back in February. After Tuesday's announcement, he wrote again the school should have worked its way into another coach. "They punted," Canzano wrote. I'd agree with that except for the state of the world today, and making a coaching move of a popular and well-respected guy in charge truly unnecessary regardless of wins. The need to win at UP just isn't that great these days, and Porter already has a contract.

Anything short of a Disney+ "Miracle on the Bluff" season, though, and UP will be looking for another coach in 12 months.

In compiling a short list of candidates, Canzano showcased just how little attention the Pilots generate even to experienced journalists, and he missed the perfect candidate who's just two miles away from the Chiles Center. It's Tony Broadous, head coach of the Portland Community College program for the past eight seasons (and Grant High for a decade before that).

There is not a better choice for the Portland Pilots than Broadous, and he needs to be on the radar for the school because when I've talked with sports folks in the area about him at the University of Portland the main response has been "now that would be exciting."

Broadous moved from Grant, which won the state title in 2008 under his guidance, to PCC in 2012 with the idea that might lead to a four-year school in the future. The Panthers had just come off a winless season in which they lost games by an average of 37 points. The program had never been to the Northwest Athletic Association of Community Colleges playoffs in spite of the fact half the eight teams in their division qualified each year by finishing fourth or higher. In spite of sitting directly across the street from Jefferson High, the program had basically no pulse. That changed quickly.

In year one under Broadous, Portland missed the playoffs by just one win, and in year two ... it won the NWAACC title. Two years removed from a winless season, PCC had a league title (2014) in its first-ever trip to the playoffs.

In the past six seasons, in spite of being the only full-time coach and having no budget for anything but Facetime chats, Portland has been to the playoffs again four times, and reached the NWAACC tournament semifinals in 2018. They were headed to the tournament again this season before it was cancelled.

Moving from a former NBA coach and local basketball legend to a community college coach would be quite a gamble for UP, but that's exactly the kind of thing Disney+ was made for - and the Pilots desperately need that kind of attention. Broadous, 51, is worthy of that opportunity starting with his connections in Portland. People know him. And, his connections around the region - coaches know him. And, his work on the court - PCC is a regular winner and has all-league players each season.

Given the opportunity to recruit to a four-year program, with numerous full-time assistants, it's exciting to think what might happen in the Chiles Center starting in 2021.

Broadous isn't going to be an expensive hire - maybe the program could use some of that savings on an additional recruiting coordinator - and he's probably going to be extremely loyal if some success brings other schools calling.

Canzano's short list of successors had a few names tossed in to look impressive starting with Portlander and former Blazer Damon Stoudamire, the head coach of WCC rival Pacific. After three losing seasons, Stoudamire was on the Hot Seat for much of this season, but the Tigers won 23 games, and he was recently named the nation's minority coach of the year. One more solid season and big name programs will come calling. Portland's calls next season - even this past season - would be going to voicemail.

Former UC Santa Barbara coach Bob Williams made the list, but he's, well, who is he again to Portland fans?

Greg Clink has guided Chico State to regular success at Div. II, but he's been there for 12 secure seasons and, again, who's he to Portland fans?

Barret Peery is the head coach at Portland State, and has averaged 18 wins per season in his first three years there. Moving across town wouldn't be a stretch, but would involve rebuilding another program and he's got a lot more of a shot at winning a conference title in the program he's already building.

And, finally, former UNLV head coach Dave Rice, who led his alma mater to NCAA trips twice in five (full) seasons, more than a dozen wins over higher ranked teams, and claimed the top pick in the NBA Draft (2013 - Anthony Bennett) as program highlights. But, the school abruptly fired him during his sixth season - that doesn't speak well about making boosters happy. Since 2017, he's been an assistant at Washington, which finished last in the Pac-12 this season.

Gonzaga coach Mark Few has been vocal about WCC members needing to spend more on their programs so as to get more teams to the NCAA Tournament - and the riches that conference members share in. But, money doesn't always buy success in any sport, and neither do big names as the school has found out. Coaches sell dreams that need to turn into reality, and Broadous has enough of that on his resume to be able to recruit on Day One, in spite of that resume just being at the high school and community college level. And he's going to need to jump right in on Day One because of not having any ability to recruit during the season.

UP is still feeling the glow of its women's basketball team performing a Disney+ miracle by playing its way into the NCAA Tournament under a first-year coach and having been picked for last by conference head coaches. That coach, Michael Meek, was a former high school coach at Southridge in Beaverton, who moved to NCAA Div. III's George Fox in 2011.

So, the Pilots are secure for another season under Porter, but the coaching search for his replacement has likely already begun. When the names start to go on the big chalkboard, hopefully the school's athletic director, Scott Leykam, and his associates will take more than a few minutes to dream about what the Chiles Center might look like with maybe the nation's biggest underdog on the sideline at one of the nation's biggest underdogs as a program. That's a story made for the Magic Kingdom.

CORRECTION: A previous version of this story misidentified Barret Peery as the former head coach at Portland State. We regret that error.

 

PCC finishes amazing run with title

Portland goes from 0-24 to NWAACC champions in just two seasons
March 4, 2014

Two years ago, the Portland Community College Panthers just wanted to win a game.

Tuesday, they wanted to win a title, and they did with a 92-86 victory over Pierce College in the NWAACC Tournament championship game at the Toyota Center in Kennewick, Wash.

Josh Turner scored 23 points, grabbed nine rebounds and had four assists in the final on the way to being named Tournament MVP. 

"We were the underdogs all year," Turner, who averaged 21.7 points per game in four wins, told the Tri-City Herald. "It made us play harder. We had a chip on our shoulder every game.

"Tonight, we just played harder, played together. We had fun."

Portland, which went 0-24 in 2012, was making its first tournament appearance in school history.

"Nobody thought we'd be here, but we had faith in ourselves," said sophomore guard Tremaine Channel, who was 4 for 4 at the free throw line in the last 32 seconds. "We knew if we got by the first round, we'd take it all. It's unbelievable."

"It's incredible," second-year head coach Tony Broadus said. "Not unbelievable, but incredible."

After opening the tournament with a pair of nailbiter victories and then overwhelming Skagit Valley in Monday's semifinals, the Panthers (23-9) led virtually the entire game against a Pierce team also seeking a first title. Pierce (23-7) mounted a series of furious charges in the second half, but Portland countered each one.

"We knew coming in that we could do this," said Broadus, who left Grant High to take over the PCC program in the summer of 2012. "We have a great group. A great coaching staff. A great group of young men."

Pierce used a 10-3 run to get within 70-69 with 5:47 to play, but Portland never relinquished the lead. During one frenetic sequence, the teams traded baskets on eight consecutive possessions.

Turner fouled out during that stretch.

"We're deep, man," Broadus said.

With their leader watching from the bench, Portland made 10 of 12 free throws inside the final 2:22.

Portland beat Columbia Basin 56-54 Saturday, Bellevue 77-76 Sunday and Skagit Valley 96-82 Monday.

Warren Edmondson, who scored 42 points Monday, added 18 points in the final and was part of yet another scorching 3-point barrage, making 3 of 4 from beyond the arc. Forward Angelo Tupper added 17 points and was 4 of 7 from deep, C.J. Easterling had 13 ponts and seven rebounds, Carl Appleton chipped in 10 points and 10 rebounds, and Channel had 11 points and seven assists.

Portland shot 50 percent from the floor and hit 11 of 19 3-pointers. Pierce hit just 5 of 24 3-pointers.

"Give all the credit to Portland," said Pierce coach Bill Mendelson. "They hit some big shots. They did a great job."

Portland exploded to a 30-15 lead to open the game, but Pierce charged back with a 15-0 transition-fueled flurry to tie. Turner sparked a 10-2 Panthers run that gave Portland a 44-39 lead at halftime.

Turner had 17 and Edmondson 10 for Portland at halftime. Jacobs had 11 and Paul Loranger nine for Pierce.

Portland was 7 for 14 on 3-pointers, the opportunistic Raiders 16 for 26 on 2s. There were five lead changes. Four ties.

Edmondson was named to the all-tournament first team, joining Pierce's Chris Parker (18 points Tuesday) and Jacobs (13 points, seven rebounds, six assists), Joseph Stroud of Highline and Edmonds' Payton Pervier.

Second-teamers included Elijah Smith and Malik Barnes of Skagit Valley, Clark's Sean Price, Chemeketa's Bryce White and Chris Willis of Treasure Valley.

Portland's Appleton was named the tourney's Most Inspirational Player.

PIERCE— Gary Jacobs 6-17 1-2 13, Devin Matthews 5-12 1-3 12, David Baze 4-11 0-0 8, Isaac Barsh 2-9 3-4 7, Christopher Parker 7-16 0-0 18, Keaton Corr 0-0 0-0 0, Mark Royster 0-0 0-0 0, Alex Johnson 3-4 0-0 6, David Jeffries 1-3 0-0 2, Paul Loranger 7-9 6-6 20. Totals 35-81 11-15 86.

PORTLAND — Warren Edmondson 5-11 5-7 18, Marcus Bailey 0-1 0-0 0, Tremaine Channel 2-5 5-6 11, Jordan Wood 0-0 0-0 0, Josh Turner 9-18 3-7 23, Anthony Hines II 0-0 0-0 0, Ryan Dethlefs 0-0 0-0 0, Carl Appleton 4-7 2-2 10, CJ Easterling 5-8 3-5 13, Angelo Tupper 6-11 1-2 17. Totals 31-61 19-29 92.

Halftime—Portland 44, Pierce 39. 3-point goals—Pierce 5-24 (Parker 4-10, Matthews 1-5, Jacobs 0-5, Baze 0-3, Johnson 0-1), Portland 11-19 (Tupper 4-7, Edmondson 3-4, Channel 2-4, Turner 2-4). Rebounds—Pierce 41 (Matthews 8), Portland 44 (Appleton 10). Assists—Pierce 19 (Matthews 8), Portland 23 (Channel 7). Turnovers—Pierce 9, Portland 15. Fouls—Pierce 21, Portland 15. Fouled out—Turner.

Panthers score historic win

PCC's men's basketball team clinches its first berth in NWAACC tourney
Feb. 19, 2014 / By Cliff Pfenning, Oregonsports Journal

PORTLAND - The wait is over for the Portland Community College men's basketball program.

After 29 years of consistent futility, the Panthers finally reached the NWAACC tournament.

A 32-point effort from Josh Turner, and a late-game run capped a 111-106 victory over the visiting Chemeketa Storm Wednesday to clinch at least a tie for first place in the NWAACC Southern Division.

With only a road game at Southwestern Oregon remaining on their schedule, the Panthers can finish no worse than a three-way tie for first. With four teams headed to the 16-team tournament, Portland is in, only two years removed from a winless season.

"It's a great feeling to get the program to the tournament for the first time, especially with a game like this," PCC coach Tony Broadous said. "Our guys put in a lot of hard work to make this happen, and it paid off.

"Now, we'll see about winning the division."

Chemeketa got a stellar performance from guard Bryce White, but couldn't hold off the Panthers, who trailed by nine twice early in the second half.

Portland improved to 19-8 overall and 10-3 in division play, while Chemeketa dropped to 12-13, 8-5. The Storm is still in line for a tournament berth with a game against Linn-Benton Saturday.

Wednesday's game featured a tense second half in which the lead changed 11 times and there were eight ties, the last at 99-all. The Panthers then got a 3-pointer from Turner with 1:38 left, and a basket on their next possession for a 104-99 lead and hit seven of eight free throws in the final minute to close out the win.

 

 

 

PCC might finally be ready to win

JOURNAL: This week, we focus on the task Tony Broadous has at Portland's JC
Dec. 10, 2012 / By Cliff Pfenning, Oregonsports Journal

The challlenge of building a winning men's basketball program at Portland Community College might be significant, but it hasn't scared anyone off.

When the head coaching job opened in spring, after an 0-24 season, applications flowed in - more than 60 by the time the hiring process moved to its second phase.

But, among all the candidates, one stood out immediately - Tony Broadous, who had been coaching at nearby Grant High for the past 10 years.

Broadous guided the Generals to a state championship, coached within USA Basketball's summer program in 2010 and sent numerous players to the NCAA Div. I college ranks. And, his background was from the neighborhood, having grown up in North and Northeast Portland.

But, maybe even better for the program, Broadous had a strong understanding of what turning PCC into a winner would mean for his career. If he could turn the Panthers into a winner, there's likely a four-year college program that would show interest in his moving there. It was only a short time before the school hired him.

"That's definitely where I see my career path going," Broadous said last week. "This is a school that I love, and there would be nothing better than if I can turn the program here into a winner and use that experience to move to the next level."

Follow Tony Broadous' story in the Dec. 11 issue of Oregonsports Journal, which is available as a digital publication for 52 weeks at $25. Check out the sample of this week's issue and subscribe today.

Also, this week the Journal covers Sheldon's win over Lake Oswego in the Class 6A football state final, as well as the Oregon City girls basketball team's renewed vigor for winning the program's first state title in four years. This upcoming week, they'll be working on their game in Hawaii.

And, how does Hillsboro look at the value of its stadium complex that will soon play host to a Class A baseball team?

That and we show off the pairings for what the High School football bowl season would look like for Oregon.

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